Turkey Bone Broth

turkey bone broth

One of the best parts of cooking a turkey over the holidays is the turkey bone broth you can make with the bones. Yes, save those bird bones no one wants because you’re going to want this broth for your next batch of Green Soup! This hearty broth will help your gut heal after all of the sweets, too.

If you’re asking yourself if you really want to be that person on Thanksgiving that shouts, “NO! Don’t throw out the bones, I want them!” Allow me to answer that question for you with an absolutely yes, be that person.

Sourcing Your Turkey

What’s the deal with pasture-raised? Most of the meat we eat in our home has been raised and processed with the utmost care in mind. This means they also contain higher levels of bio-available nutrients from being raised in natural, outdoor conditions. If you’re local to Houston or San Antonio, Texas Farm to Home delivers many farm to table meat and dairy products straight to your door. We’ve been utilizing his services for over three years now. Our turkey(s) will be delivered by him next week!

You can learn more about why it’s important to consider meat sources on my Weston A. Price Foundation Overview here.

Some Other Helpful Tips

I have shared both my chicken and beef bone broth recipes as well. Be sure to check them out for a fool-proof way to store your broth as well:

Making Beef Bone Broth at Home

Once you use this beef bone broth recipe, you’ll never want to go back to buying store bought again! I’ve taken a lovely and decadent recipe by Rhoda Boone I found on Epicurious and adapted it to make a more affordable, bulk batch of delicious beef broth.

Be sure to visit my Chicken Broth Recipe for instructions on how to bag your broth to both store and thaw it easily!

Quality Matters when Making Beef Bone Broth at Home

When it comes to nourishment, you are what your food eats. It’s really important to source grass-fed beef from reputable farms (local is best!) to obtain the most nutrients out of what you’re feeding yourself and your family.

Making Beef Bone Broth at Home

Optimum health requires animal foods and fats. Vitamins A, D, K2, B12, B6, Zinc, essential fatty acids, and amino acids are all beneficial nutrients. You will find some of these beneficial nutrients exclusively in sustainably raised animal products.

Conventionally Raised vs. Pasture Raised

Conventionally raised animals are typically raised in ultra-confinement conditions with little to no access to the outdoors. They are almost always fed artificially with inexpensive GMO feed. They are often given performance-enhancing drugs which causes them to be efficient and profitable. There is also usually zero regard to humane processing options available when it comes to conventional meat. Modern conveniences do not come with consequences on both the animals well-being and the health of those consuming the meat products produced this way.

Pasture raised animals are raised primarily outdoors with appropriate access to shelter to protect them against the elements. They are almost always fed expensive non-GMO feed or grass. They are not given antibiotics (mainly because it’s often unnecessary in their living conditions with no confinement). These animals are typically processed humanely with care and thanks being given to the animal. Regenerative farming is also common with these farming methods.

Making beef bone broth at home requires some homework, if you want to do it right.

Know Your Farmer(s)

The most important thing to consider when sourcing animal products we consume is not always looking for the cheapest cut. Sometimes we are in positions where we have to consider the cost of our food. I am currently one of those people. Based on what I know, though, I can no longer make a decision based ONLY on the lowest price tag.

I think what we have been conditioned to blindly do in our culture is walk up to the meat section of our grocery store and not consider it’s origination. We don’t ask questions like, “Did this animal have access to sunshine and grass over the course of it’s life?” Instead we tend to think more like, “What’s on sale this week?”

There are nutrients our bodies require to obtain optimum health. Some of those are EXCLUSIVELY found in animal products raised in the right environment (pasture raised, etc.) These nutrients are simply not found in nature outside of these conditions.

Let’s stop considering simply the cost of the meat we are buying. But, let’s also consider the cost of what looking the other way could mean for these animals, as well as our health. Are you with me?